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XMAS HUMBER 





THE RED GROSS BED 




In two clays afier the publicaiion of this 
number the boxes whidi haue been placed in 
the various barracks forthepurpose of collect- 
ingfundsfor the Ruhleben Red Gross Bed will 
be called in. 

ITIessrs. rSimms and Ford haue kindly 
undertaken to open and count the eontents of 
the boxes and the moneij will be handed ooer 
to the British Red Gross authorities to be de- 
uofed to the foundation of a "Ruhleben Bed" 
in one of their hospitals. 

It will be poinfed out to the authorities 
at Borne that this collection has been extended 
ooer seueral 'months in orderfhaf small weekly 
amounts might be subscribed and musf in 
no way be regarded as a donation from any 
superfluity of cash in the Gamp but as the 
outcome of uery real sacrifice on the part of 
a great numbcr of the subscribers. 



2^3E 






fei 




R 



In 

uhleben(Xmp 



CHRISTMAS 1915 



BEH1ND THE WJRE IN ENGLAND. 

UXV/E'RE jugged — of that there can be no manner of doubl 
** Some of us have been a long time in jug, a few not quite 
so long" (This is the opening, translated from the Germ an 
of course) of the leading article in "Stobsiade" the fortnightly 
organ of the Camp for German prisoners-of-war at Stobs, 
Great Britain (can any kind reader inform us where Stobs 
exactly is). It is a briglht little four-paged Journal redolent 
of the "Are-we-downhearted ? No!" spirit and rendering it 
very apparent that life in a "Prisoner of War Camp" is very 
much like the life in a "Civil-Gefangenlager". 

The leader continues: — 

"It is within the bounds of possibility that we shall sleep 
in thirties for many a stuffy night or it may be that the 
comfy feather bed — for one person or for two — is not so very 
far off. Who knows? Although much is done to render our 
lot a happier one no one will maintain that Stobs is to 
be recommended as a health resort for a permanent stay. — " 

No nor Ruhleben] 

"But we have patience — Lots of it. — It seems to us that 
it is wetter here than at home in Germ any and the liquid 
which is not allowed to run into our interiors is poured 
upon our exteriors." [Funny isn't it how the German main- 
tains that England is damper than Germany whereas every 
true Englishman KNOWS just the contrary to be the case.] 

"To continue, who has ever seen such a dog as that of 
our Commandant? A weird animal. Half pug, half terrier 
with bulldog legs which are ever atremble with fright. The 
only dog in the Camp. Half German, half English. Just ripe 
for naturalisation !" 



Rights of reproduction in England and elsewhere of articles and Sketches 

strictiy reserved. 

1 



Apparently the Editor in Stobs allows his pen a larger 
freedom than we accord ours for never, never would we 
have referred to the Baron von Taube's "Ruhleben Löwe" 
in such disrespectful terms. 

"And of the Camp clay! One could write chapters about it." 

Why our Ruhleben mud has already been accorded vo- 
lumes! 

"Might one not also demand that the public generally 
sleep less on its back in the future so that the' aoncert of 
snores may at least take on a more pianissimo tone." 

Huh! They should hear old — (We leave readers to fill 
in name of loft or corridor champion.)! 

The article concludes : — "We represent only the noblest ele- 
ments of Human nature. We will report the sports, sing 
the Eisteddefod, elevate the theatre and altogether will be 
a sunbeam lighting the gloom of Camp life. We will awaken 
the sleepy, talk of the homeland and — between the lines — 
of our hopes, of our future happiness. 

Anything rather than be downhearted ! And with sparkling 
eyes we say softly beneath our breath: — 
'God bless Germany! 
'God bless the Kaiser V" 

.How we can sympathize with all this and how deeply 
we ourselves feel the English complement thereto. All the 
"Stobsiade" hopes to do in Stobs we trust we can perform 
in Ruhleben. — Only with one exception ! We have more respect 
for our editorial person than to undertake the responsibility 
of awakening the sleepy! ^ 

But, good Stobsiade, to your f God C ^ 

bless Germany!' we reply with our ^God ^ s 

bless England!' and to your 'God bless 
the Kaiser!' with our 'God bless Ge- 
orgie!' And then, reaching hands across 
the sea to you, we will both cry together: 
"Damn that barbed wire!" 




- S"^«STe> C^ u < . w'itti hi( ii><fU r^iny^ fem o! r^oKleUc^ ^1^4^«-^ 




BAR. 11. LINES UP. 



"RING OUT WILD BELLST 

"Ring out wild Beils !" The verses sprang 
From one who, in his slumber spells, 
Had never heard with sudden clang 
"Ring out wild bells." 

Bell hangers, here, seem scarce, for yells 
Of "HANG THAT BELL!" füll often rang 
At noon through barracks, rooms and cells. 

I, too, have said, with inward pang 
Obeying those insistent knells,— 
Td like to ring his neck who sang: 
"Ring out wild bells!" 



HOMAGE. 

Time plants his foot our necks upon, — 

However high we climb; 
Time beats us all — save Peebles-Conn, 
For Conn beats time. 

LLOYD WOLLEN. 
1* 



THE THEATRE. 



CINCE "In Ruhleben Camp" last appeared \ve have had 
plays of all sorts and sizes, good plays, bad plays, merry 
plays, sad plays, plays without words, plays with songs, old 
plays, nevv plays, English plays, French plays — who will dare 
to complain of the monotony of life in Ruhleben? It would 
be rank ingratitude to our actor friends. 

The first item on my list 
is "Preedy and the Countess" 
and I may be pardoned if I 
linger awhile to discant on 
the merits of the Performance. 
Previous to this production 
\\e had had no comedy the pro- 
duction of which Struck one 
as really finished. In "The 
Silver Box" we had seen that 
the Camp could produce a 
tragedy cast which might cer- 
tainly rank with any put for- 
ward by the leading amateur 
societies at home bin the co- 
medy had always had its one 
or two weak characters. "Pree- 
dy", too, is a play which de- 
pends entirely upon the acting. 
While reading it, I myself 
"achieved sleep" before I got 
to the end of the second act 
To present the play successfully 
a "star" was necessary for 
the title role and an extraordi- 
narily safe cast to back him 
up. At the last moment Mr. 
Hart appeared on the scene 
and taking the part at only three 
days notice made a brilliant 
success of it. Mr. Anderson, 
who was the producer, has 
mr. hopkirk as the prodigal son. indeed done the Camp theatre 




a good turn in unearthing an urdoubted artist All the other 
characters too worked hard and, despite Mr. Danhorn's ten- 
dency to over-do his part and Mr. Burgoyne's gaucherie, the 
general affect was such as to eclipse any previous comedy Per- 
formance in the Camp. 

"My Pal Jerry" was a jolly music hall sketch per- 
form ed by the Brothers Maurice, Harry Stafford & Co. and 
despite the fact that they had had to write up the book 
from memory the audience went away in great good humour. 








"The Prodigal Son", a pantomimic drama by M. Carre 
with musical accompaniment by A. Wormser, followed and 
was undoubtedly the most complete success the camp theatre 
has seen. Some of the people who enjoyed "Preedy" did not 
care for "My Pal Jerry" and the majority of both audiencies 
were bored to death by "The Master Builder" but "The 
Prodigal Son" appealed to all. The producer, Mr. H. G. Hop- 
kirk had, to begin with, a caste to which no one could 
take exception. All parts were exhausted. As the son, Mr. 
Hopkirk himself secured the sympathy of the whole house ; 
while as a light little light-o'-love Mr. Macmillan set the whole 
Camp achuckle. Merrit was as effective as ever while Mr. 
West was so good as to mäke us all wish to see what 
he would do with an ordinary part. Skin-the-goat (other- 
wise known as Mr. Wilson) made a delightful old roue. And 
who will ever forget that priceless waddle of A. Holmes , ? 
Narurally the play could not have been successful without 
really wonderful accompaniment and Mr. Weber r s handling 
of the orchestra was as masterly as his colleague's handling 
of the players. I expect to see other productions equal to 
this and to "Preedy" but I confess I do not expect to see 
them surpassed in Ruhleben. 

The two French plays "On opere sans douleur" and 
"L'Anglais tel qu'on le parle" were both jolly little comedies 
and received applause. (Continued on page 8.) 




' TO 





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8 

"The Trial by Jury" was our first essay at English comic 
opera and was a far better production than one would ex- 
pect in a camp in which the female dement is entirely 
lacking. Mr. Corless deserves commendation for his hard work. 
It would be well however not to blind ourselves to the fact 
that although we have cheated Nature very successfully with 
regard to our stage heroines, when we come to comic opera 
she has us on the hip. Mr. Welland's Performance was all 
that could be expected of a mere male but unfortunately one 
must not expect very much. The other parts were all well sustained 
notably Mr. Hamlyn as the Judge, Mr. Anstey as the Counsel 
and Austin as Defendant while the get-up of the jury was 
undoubtedly ;the hit of the evening. 

"The Trial" was preceded by two one-act pieces both 
of which were by Camp authors. The main idea of Mr. Bar- 
ton's "Well Pm — " was humorous enough but his dialogue 
was painfully boring and altogether his piece gave one an 
impression of inexperience. The casting and acting of it too 
left much to be ;desired but fortunately Mr. Eden's pyjamas 
saved the Situation. 

Mr. Tivey's "Fooling" was a much better play, the dia- 
logue being witty throughout and the handling of the theme 
more careful though the ending was somewhat sudden. Had 
Mr. Tivey stayed among us I should have looked forward 
to seeing something much better from him. 

I am not going to attempt to criticise the Master Builder, 
for fo do so, one requires more Space and time than is at 
my disposal. Mr. Hatfield's Translation justified itself in the 
acting and altogether I think we can record the production 
a success. Of course a very large proportion of the Camp 
did not in the least want Ibsen and the players had to con- 
tend with an unduly critical audience. Still the play made 
its appeal to many and though perhaps Ibsen is not suitable 
for to do so, one requires more space and time than is at 
not haye an occasional Single Performance and I hope the 
Entertainments Committee will see its way to give us now 
and then a repertory week, in the programmes of which 
some others of Ibsen might well be included. 

"The Importance of being Earnest" was hardly accorded 
the care in casting which Mr. Welland's previous work has 
led us all to expect of him. Despite the flaws however, the 
audiences were well pleased ani again we have to be grate- 







ful to Mr. Hart, Mr. Eden and Mr. Macmillan for reajly 
finished Performances. Mr. McDermott made a wonderful 
Miss Prism; I hope to have the opportunity of seing him 
again in a similar part. 

"La Petite Chocolatiere" was a great triumph for its 
producer, Mr. Bell, whose work I cannot sufficiently praise. 
The casting and the scenery (designed by the producer) left 
nothing to be desired and the acting was such that I can 
only say I have never seen better in Ruhleben. Many pro- 

2 



10 

ducers have looked around in vain for a really fascinating 
"flapper" but in Mr. Goodhind Mr. Bell has found a jewel 
and I prophesy some hard work in the future for the gentle- 
man (or should I say lady?). Space forbids my mentioning 
all the other characters but I cannot refrain from remarking 
on Rosette's sweetness. 

Altogether the productions of the last two months have 
reached a Standard that is as unexpectedly high as it is 
welcome. PLAYGOYER. 

THEATRE-NOTES. 

Who said 

that "The Master Builder" was a bad attempt at teachkn 
the Camp the importance of being earnest? 



that "My Pal Jerry" was only fooling? 



that those people who thought the finale of "Preedy 
and the Countess" was going to be an Enfant prodigue were 
badly mistaken? 

that "Well Pm — !" was what the audience said? 




Sßie Jro9i<?ö.l \So/2. Sp 6äjz 3a.£teä "C&2/* 



11 



THE RUHLEBEN1TE AT HOME. 

I WAS out! How I managied it I cannot teil you at present. 
It must suffice that after some startling adventures I had 
arrived Home in time for Christmas. 

It was glorious to be in a nice bed again, that is to 
say it would have been glorious if I had not awakened so 
late that I had to jump up at once so as not to be too 
late to wash. s I yawned sleepily as I put on my slippers 
and feit round under the bed without success for my washing 
bowl. 

Someone must have pinched it I thought, probably Emma 
who is my sister arid sleeps next door. 

I marched into her room unceremoniously. 

"Here you blighter" I began "You've pinched my basin". 

She opened her eyes "Don't talk rubbish" she said sotne- 
what sharply "And kindly knock when you come in!" 

"That be hanged for a yarn if you pinch my washing, basin. " 

"What are you talking about?" 

"My washing basin of course! Bück up they'll be cleaning 
outh the corridor soon and I want to get washed first " 

"Don't be so stupid I haven't got your basin! Go and 
ring the bell and Pll ask Kate what has become of it." 

Kate the maid had no idea where it was but volunteered 
to go and look for it. 

"It's in his room Miss" she said on her return. 

"In my room" I repeated "Why I could have sworn 
it was not under the bed". 

"I should hope not indeed!" said my sister "Ifs on the 
washing table of course". 

I returned to my room and sure enough there it was 
exactly where she had said. Why on earth they can't put 
things in their proper places, the Lord only knows. But 
thaf s always the way now. Nothing is ever where it ought 
to be. Why there's not even a broom in the bedrooms. 

However I had got my basin and that was the chief thing. 
Filling it with water I took it out into the corridor, and re- 
turned for a chair. I might have saved myself the trouble, 
there was not a decent chair in the whole room; only a 
couple of things with cane seats, which are not the slightest 
good to anybody. After skirmishing round in the other rooms 

2* 



12 




THE POND STORES. AFTER A SHOWER. 



and places for a bit I succeeded in finding a so-called house- 
maid's box which looked promising. I emptied the contents 
out into the corridor and a fearful lot of rubbish it was too. 
I kicked the stuff about thoroughly, but could find absolutely 
nothing worth having except a couple of nails and a small 
piece of wire. One of the nails was immediately hammered 
into the outside of the door to hang the towel ort, the 
other I carefully stowed away for emergencies. From what 
I see of this place, I shall probably need a considerable 
number of nails beforej I get it anything like shipshape. 

The housemaid's box turned upside down proved quite 
satisfactory and I «was at length able to get on with the 
business of waShing and I had finished the main part of 
the business and \was splashing water happily over one foot, 
w'hen my sister came out of her room in a dressing-gown. 

"Bück up, you lazy beggar", I yelled, a You know they 
will be wanting to clean the corridor in a minute." 

"Jack, go back to your room at once. What are you 
doing here?" came the unexpected answer. 



13 

"Doing," I repeated, "Pm washing of course." 

"Yes, but what tdo you want do come here to wash for" 
and then illogically, "Besides, Kate might have come along- 
while you were " 

"If it's Kate's turn to do the corridor, she ought to have 
been washed long ago," I interrupted severely, "Where in the 
name of Heaven do you expect me to wash anyway?" 

"In your room. Where eise?" 

"And make the whole place vvet for half the day. A 
nice row there would be about it. Quite apart from that 
there is not a decent chair in the room to wash on." 

But she was not listening. 

"What's that?" she said sharply, pointing to the heap 
of rubbish. 

"Oh! Only some old rubbish I found in here" I said, 
kicking the housemaid's box, and noticing that the explanation 
did not seem to soothe her, "It's nothing worth having, I've 
been through it all very carefully", I assured her. 




SNOW ON THE PROMENADE DES ANGLAISES. 



14 

"But the corridor is not the place for rubbish," she retorted 
still more hotly, in spite of rny attempt at a reconciliation. 

I was going to retort in kind, when I suddenly remem- 
bered it was Christmas morning and I determined a last 
attempt at peace. 

"Never mind old girl", I said, "I'm very sorry if you 
don't like it. But please have a decent-sized packing case 
put in my room, will you? And novv you'd better bück up 
and get was'hed. Here, you can have my basin if you like. 
I'm finished," and I gracefully threw the remainder of the 
water along the side of that fatal corridor. 

That did for me. 

"Go into your room, you silly idiot," she said. 

I can't understand Emmie. She's changed tremendously; 
she does not seem nearly so sympathetic somehow. 

T. GOVETTE. 

"THERE WAS A COW." 

A hitberto unpublislied poem from the portfolios 
of Mr. Senoj Xacnud. (Published without his permission.) 

The cow with gasps of lowing pain 
Essays the steep ascent to gain 
Though built for other sorts of flights 
She 'tempts to scale arboreal heights. 

Cow! The tree is made of wood, 
Climbing that will do no good. 
Cow, good cow, 'tis not for thee, 
Or such as thou to climb a tree! 

Follow the promptings of the Soul 
Eat and grow fat; attain thy goal, 
Namely, the prized sky-blue bow 
dr Merit in the Cattle-Show. 

True to thyself thou then shalt live 
And "n" quarts twice a day shalt give. 
Oh! May no lying spirit grow 
Within thy bosom, gentle cow. 



15 



FOOTBALL. 

^VNE only realises the tremendous part the Sport/ s Ground 
^-^ plays in our circumstances here when (as rarely happens) 
the racecourse is closed. Hundreds of us roam aimlessly 
around looking for something to pass away the hours. Four- 
tunately for a great number of those here it is in their nature 
to take advantage of our present compulsory inactivity in 
the world's affairs by studying. In this direction the op- 
portunities are manifold and no doubt many, especially among 
the younger section, will learn much. The events which have 
placed some of the most brilliant scholars of Europe in this 
camp and their generous willingness to give those desiring it 
the benefit of their knowledge creates a unique opening for 
those who wish to broaden their education. There are, how- 
ever, a great many men in the Camp whose callings place 
the thought of study if santa claus came to ruhleben. 
outside their pale. Apart 
frorn their actual labour 
in times of peace they 
interest themselves more 
particularly in sport than 
in anything eise. For all 
grades in Camp the In- 
stitution of our national 
games was a boon but for the non- 
studious it was a real Godsend. It 
provides not only healthy pleasant 
exercise for the players, but is also 
an interesting time killer for those 
who through various disabilities are 
debarred from actually taking part 
in games and therefore are com- 
pelled to play the part of spectators. 
As in the last seasou a Football 
Association was formed consisting 
of a delegate from each Barrack and 
a chairman and secretary. The cap- 
tain of the Camp Mr. J. Powell 




f < *f> 






16 

is the Hon. President with two other captains Messrs. L. ö. 
Beaumont and J. Swift, Hon. Vice Presidents. 

Barracks 2, 3, 4, 5, 20, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 atid 17 run two 
teams, one each in our Ist and 2nd League. Barrack 15 and 
"The Boys" each has a team in the 2nd League only. 

The rules we play under are as near as possible those 
laid down by the English F. A. with two exceptions viz. we 
play only 35 minutes each way, and there are no transfers. 
The latter rule is very strict and a man is only allowed to 
play for the Barrack he was located in at the opening. of 
our second campaign on October Ist. 

The first two days of the re-commencement were spent 
in preparing our two pitches. We had many willing hands 
so that when we officially started the season on October 3rd 
with an exhibition match between two teams chosen by Steve 
Bloomer and John Cameron the grounds looked pictures. 

The Commander of the Camp, Baron von Taube, paid us 
the honour of kicking-off. 

After a grand game Bloomer's side won by 5 — 2. 

The following six days the pitches were allotted to the 
barracks for practice matches. 

The league tournaments started on Oct. lOth. 

By Monday next (writing on November 25th) the first 
haft of the leagues will have been finished, meaning that 
each team will have played the other once. The following 
day we shall commence our Cup Competitions, one for the 
first leagues and one for the second league. These will be 
through by the end of the year and then the second half 
of the leagues will be played. In addition to the league com- 
petitions there are daily two or three friendly games played. 
These are commonly known as "Ragtime Matches" and create 
much fun and interest. 

There will be no prizes whatever given by the R. F. A. 
but "In RUHLEBEN CAMP" have generously promised 
Souvenirs of an unique character, the particulars of which will 
be found elsewhere. 

There is an athletic störe in camp where one can obtain 
all the necessary gear. But as footballs cost 15/- each we 
have had to depend on the generosity of these at home in 
this matter. To F. J. Wall Esq. and some friends of John 
Cameron's at Chiswick we tender our most grateful thanks 
for their present of three footballs each, without which the 

(Continued on page 18.) 



17 




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18 

purchase of these articles would have thrown a great bürden 
on our slender resources. 

The three outstanding teams up to the present are Bar- 
rack 9 in the first league who have gone through the first 
half of the season without losing a solitary point, and Bar^ 
rack 3 and the Boys in the second league, a team composed 
entirely of barrack youngsters from ships. These lads, the* 
eldest of whom is not more than 18, play really fine football 
and their matches create the keemest interest. Their- friend 
and adviser is Mr. Chas. Pow. Bar. 3, the leaders of the 2nd 
league, have shown excellent consistent form and fully de- 
serve their proud position. They combine splendidly and if 
able to keep the same team together will no doubt win the 
Champions hip outright. 

Of the form slhown I will ask, Bloomer, Brearley, Wolsten- 
holme and Cameron to give their impressions. 

Wolstenholme is the captain of the present league leaders, 
Barrack 9, and his team is certainly a credit to the old Ever^ 
ton and Blackburn Rover's half-back. 

"Well Sam what about the football in the Camp?" I 
asked. 

"Considering the circumstances I reckon ifs quite good", 
he answered. "Do you think any of the players here have 
shown form which would entitle them to be given a trial 
with league teams at home?" 

"Most decidedly I ,do", Sam said. "Of course," he added, 
"it would hardly do for me to mention the names ot the par- 
ticular players I have in mind, but there are men here whomi 
I shall certainly recommend to first class clubs when the 
proper time arrives*" 

To a further query as to his personal expriences in Camp- 
football Wolstenholme warmly acknowledged his appreciation 
of the full-hearted support given by the Camp in general and 
his barrack in particular and finally remarked he did not know 
what we should have done without our football. 

John Brearley hesitated before answering my first question 
as to his impressions, but John was always that way in- 
clined. Then he opened out and said: 

"The football is not a patch on that of last season." 

"Why?" I asked. 

"Well," said he, "the reasons ought to be quite obvious 
without going into minute details. But one great fact", he 



19 



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ANOTHER VIEW OF BAR. 11. 



continued, "against really clever play is the ground. As you 
know it has cut up prerty badly through the great nutnber 
of games played on it, and the lack of proper Utensils to 
keep it in order." 

"And what about the form of the men?" I quereid. 

Brearley answered: "With all due respect to everybody 
only a very few have shown decided improvement and the 
most of these are men who have never before played Asso- 
ciation »Football. On the whole," he concluded, "the play 
has been much above the Standard one expected and some 
of the players may be heard of later on in English Football." 

As is only natural Steve Bloom er is the central figure of 
Ruhleben Football. Although he has had his forty first birthday 
among us his interest in the game, has been so great that he 
has only missed playing in one match for his barrack during 
the whole time football has been played in the Camp. 

"Wlry the lads all play grand," he replied when asked 
his opinion of the players here. "Some of them would of 
course do better if theyM play with their heads a littl-e more 
and if the forwards would shoot offener and not mess about 
so much in front of goal." 

"But," added the famous inside right, "the football they 
play is marvellous considering everything and it would be 
grossly unfair to criticise them very minutely." 

3* 



20 

"Would some of the players, in your opinion, be goöd 
enough for first class teams at home?" I asked. 

"They would that," he promptly answered. "Give them 
the opportunity and a bit of the right Coaching and one or 
two of the lads here would be class enough for any team." 

John Cameron, the old Hotspurs manager, is pur secre- 
tar> T and the guiding spirit of the management Under his 
care the whole machinen' runs like clockwork. When I asked 
him his opinion of the form here he said: "There's nothing 
wrong with it, except in one instance, when Barrack 11 beat 
Barrack 10 a few weeks ago. Seriously though the play is 
quite as good as anyone can expect." 

Fred. B. Pentland. 



LEAGUE TABLE. 
First Division. 



Barrack. 


P. 


W. 


L. 


D. 


F. 


A. 


Pts. 


9 


10 


10 








33 


4 


20 


10 


10 


. 8 


2 





27 


10 


16 


5 


10 


7 


3 





33 


17 


14 


11 


10 


7 


3 





37 


24 


14 


8 


10 


4 


5 


1 


18 


19 


9 


20 


10 


4 


6 





25 


23 


8 


4 


10 


3 


6 


1 


21 


25 


7 


17 


10 


3 


7 





19 


30 


6 


3 


10 


2 


6 


2 


18 


31 


6 


7 


10 


2 


7 


1 


16 


37 


5 


2 


10 


2 


7 


1 


14 


41 


5 






Second 


Division. 






3 


12 


11 


1 





42 


11 


22 


9 


12 


/ 


1 


4 


30 


13 


18 


Boys 


12 


8 


3 


1 


31 


15 


17 


5 


12 


6 


4 


2 


21 


13 


14 


4 


12 ' 


5 


3 


4 


19 


15 


14 


8 


12 


5 


3 


4 


24 


23 


14 


10 


12 


6 


4 


2 


23 


24 


14 


20 


12 


4 


7 


1 


16 


20 


9 


7 


12 


3 


6 


3 


17 


27 


9 


11 


12 


3 


8 


1 


10 


19 


7 


17 


12 


3 


8 


1 


17 


39 


7 


15 


12 


2 


8 


2 


8 


27 


6 



12 2 9 1 15 27 



21 



FRPM 5HAKE.5PEAEE. . 




I WOÜLD I HAD THY INCHE15". 



22 



H 



HE THOUGHT HE SAW. 

(With apologies to Lewis Carrol.) 

E thought he saw a Seraphim 



That played upon the bones. 
He looked again, and saw it was 

The poems of 

"I thought" he said "such dulcet strains 
Must come from higher zones." 

He thought he saw poor Ibsen's ghost 

That writhed as though in pain. 

He looked again, and saw it was 

The child of H- 's brain. 

" 'ExcitingV not the word," he said 

For Castles built in Spain." 

He thought he saW a captain's badge 
That lacked a captain's arm. 
He looked again, and saw it was 
— Nought! — but a false alarm. 

"Be still, my heart, be still," he said 

"Be calm, my soul, be calm." 

He thought he saw' a merry wight 

Who winked a merry wink. 

He looked again, and saw it was 

A reveller in "clink". 

And to himself he murmured soft, 
"Drink, pretty creature, drink". 

He thought he saw the Lager "Rag" 
Appear when it was due. 
He looked again, and saw it was, 
Not a report, but true. 

"Now, isn't this top-hole" he said, 

"In time for Xmas too." 



23 







Shz otAsr i <? orx. , they took th.<\t 

Z<x$£ coeeZc 



24 



l-22a - Barraeks G.B.- Government Stores (bread), 

23-25 - Grand-stands H.- Hospitals 

25 used for Educational Classes H .W. -Hof wate r 

26-Tea-house(ßarrack). LB. -Invalid barrack 



N 



W«- 



A - Athletic störe 
B-Barber 
B.H.-ßaths 
B.O.- Box- office 
Cr Casino 
Ca.- Canteen 
C.C.- Catholic church 
Car.-Carpenter 
C\r Clothes 
Ci.-Cinema 

E .- En<jraver En. - Entra nee, 
E.R 0. - Engl. Parcel office 
E.X.L.- Express letters 
F.-Greenarocer Fl.- Held 
6r Grand stand (not in use). 
G.R.-Guard roofn 
G.P.Or Germ. Parcel 
office. 



K.- Kitchens 

L.- Library 

LP.- Lost property office 

M.-Milk 

M.E.'Main entrance 

Mi.- Mineral water 

N.- Newspaper- 

Ou-Ouifitter 

0.- Offices 







Öesjgn'e^ by G.Oönes 



MX. 












/_ -.l 




5y.~Syna<rocru.e 
T.-Tailor 



Th.-Theafre(Concert hall] 
To.- Tobacco 

~~ ßarrier 



Ruhlebeii 



.Woode: 



25 



R-Praetice room( piano). R.5.- River (Spree). 

P.C.-Prisoners cells 5. - ShoemaKer 

P. C.N.- Publishing Offices R.CJ l leW5 5.ß.-'5o1diers.'barracks 
PH.- Privat house S.E.-Steam (fer beatirtg) 

P.O.- Printers S.H.- Summer house 

R.O.- Relief Office St. - Stabte (for horses) 




;^ •..- .', 






V.. ■■-.--:• %.:*.•:■ • 

■ : -v^-;:/Sh-. 









Fl. 






g& 

















"'"t""^! ' i " l " • * " *T i "1 ■ »^^Hf . y* ,j »; , ' , ^ » ^ ' ■ Tl* ! 



l'V.o.p.c. £ 



5> «8 i» a & e 



Mg) n i Tk ' 

* »kTö i 

F K V 






t~ 










Cam p, 



änce 



nwwwmwwmH i * 



T.C.rTennis courts 
W.- Wash houses 
High wire fem?£ 



Wa .- Waich m a k € r 
W.C.- Public iavatory 



i 
% 
% 

i 



i 




% 



26 

i 
i 
i 

J) In accordance with our offer to the Foot- 

K ball Association to provide a trophy for the 

players who put up the best Performance of 

each fortnight we requested the Association 

Committee to let us have the names of the 

recipients. 

The Association has chosen the teams but 

has left the choosing of the individual to the 

barrack committee or to the eleven in question. V, 

The awards are as follows: 

Bar. 7 for the game they put up against 

Bar. 8 on Oct. 17 th in which they drew 3 — 3 

(% securing their goals within ten minutes of A 

*) "time". V 

The player chosen by [the Barrack Club Y, 

to receive the trophy is R. F. WEISS. y 

— % 

ä\ Bar. 11 for beating Bar. 3 by 10 goals to 3. y 

v The player to receive trophy is A. BODIN. X 



"The Boys" for their general good play 
and especially for the match on Nov. 16th in 
which they beat Bar. 10 by 5—0. 

The player in this case is E. KELLY. S> 



i^e^eve^e^e^v^^ ^^e^"^^ 1 



* 



27 




RUGGER. SUPERMEN v. CAPTA1NS. 

\A.R- Halpin kicked off and Prof. Hart kindly consented to 
referee. With a bound Hatfield, the supermen's scrum 
half, ,seized the ball and pausing for an instant to pull hisi 
long black hair, conferred upon it all the electrical energy of 
his soundest schemes — the leather retired a few paces to the 
rear. After some rather complicated scrimmage work, Leigh 
Henry the leader of the scrum tore away, muttering "These 
people idon't realise the evocative nature of the anti-mecha- 
nical ,spiritual, quasi-futuristic force of the effect of the Rugger 

spheroi !!! The brutal crty of "Touch" brought himi 

in some measure back to his immediate surroundings. Kapp 
the nimble S. fly-half strected out a hand at the line-out, 
caught and took the ball between finger and thumb — "Ex- 
celsior!" he cried and strode down the field. Here, Fisher, 
go and see to that ■ball," cried . Powell the great full-badk, 
"I taust speak to Jones a moment — what? No, no — no 
time!" The ball now remained in the captains 25, where 
Hawkins lead his scrum in splendid fashion, and perhaps it 
was a good thinghis directions were in Hindustani. At 
last Prichard the hare-like left-wing three-quarter of the 
Supermen took the ball. "Now if I were to drop a 
goal here, a goal, the reality of that goal wöuld be im- 



28 




pressed upon your intellect by the ball going between the 
posts, but matter does not act like thät . . . life wants . . . f 
at this point the whistle blew for half-time. 

Shortly after "lemons" Pender, with a long giggle and 
brandishing bis eyeglasses in his excitment, his teeth glit- 
tering scored between the posts. Peebles Conn converted..5-0. 
After some mixed play in the centre, where Aman after in- 
effectually trying to score between his own posts subsided 
under 11 Supermen, Duncan-Jones, the dashing right wing 
of the intellectuals sprinted down the line; arriving in the cap- 
tains 25 however he paused and with dramatic gesture ex- 
claimed: — 

"Up and down the field we go 
Sometimes fast/ and sometimes slow, 
Slithering like a little orter 
Passing out to wmg three quatter 

When the " 

Asher most unkindly brought this masterpiece of epic 
poetry to a close, collaring the author low. The ball remained 
near the captains posts, until Turnbull like a race horse sped 
to his opponents goal and scored. Beaumont converted 5 — 5. 
The whistle blew for time. 



29 



SHOULD WE CR1T1C1SE? 

VY/E have received the following letters from Mr. Pentland 
™ and Mr. Warner with regard to the account of the opening 
match of the present soccer season which appeared in our 
columns and also a reply from "Young Bird", the writer of 
the same. 

We make no apology for the publication of this corre- 
spondence, despite the fact that the report referred to appeared 
two months ago, for the question of free criticism is of pri- 
mary importance "in a camp like this". Despite the weighty 
arguments put forward by the players, we are inclined fo 
think that Young Bird has made out a very fair case for 
candid criticism, not only from a sport point of view but 
also from a general Standpoint. It seems to us that if a 
man ma'kes a public appearance, be it on the sports field> 
on the stage, or as a camp official he must as a matter of 
course be prepared to meet with criticism and if not ready 
to do so then he ougfht to be content to blush unseen even 
though this entail the wasting of his sweetness on the desert air. 

Mr. Fred Pentland writes: — "In the spirit of sport, I am 
sure that Young Bird will permit me to pass a few comments 
on his criticism of the opening match. While granting that 
he has every right to express his opinion of the game and 1 
the players, I consider some of his remarks in reference 
to some of the players to be outside the bounds of reasonable 
criticism. To slate a man as Young Bird did Rogans and 
Collinson is rather hitting below the bell Neither of these 




tS'oup/r^^ /^e \Soup 






30 




A SUMMER CORNER. 



players in my humble opinion deserved the condemnation 
passed upon them. Both are young players and have proved 
their ability in Camp football to such good effect as to Warrant 
their inclusion in a representative match. It is the desire 
of the F. A. and of all true enthusiasts to help and teach 
young footb allers to improve their play but all such efforts 
will be in vain if Young Bird, or anyone eise, knocks the 
stuffing out of them by passing caustic and hurtful comments 
when they have a day off form." 

Mr. L. P. Warner writes us from Bar. 8: — "I am sure 
that all true lovers of football must have feit very keenly the 
unfair criticism by Young Bird on the display of Rogans in 
the opening match. Evidently as designated by the nom de 
plume he has adopted, "Young Bird" is very very young and 
his youthfulness applies to his experience and capability of 
critizing football. In my opinion Rogans' display was a very 
useful one indeed against a tricky combination of forwards, 
and the remarks in your issue of No. 9 are as unjust as 
they are unmerited. In any case I feel sure that it is not 
the intention of the editor of "In Ruhleben Camp" to allow^ 
criticism such as the case in point, which in a camp of this 
kind will probably give "the subject operated upon" a 
most unhappy time and our football here has not been or- 
ganised with this object in view but just the opposite". 



31 

In reply Young Bird says: — I am exceedingly surprised 
that a player of Mr. Pentland's standing should take up an 
attitude with regard to criticism which I can only define by 
the phrase namby pamby. For him to suggest that I was 
hitting below the belt in saying that a man was a passenger 
is on the face of it absurd. It was my duty to say what 
I thought (and the fact that my opinion was shared by a 
very large proportion of the spectators is interesting though 
it does not affect the case) and, with all due deference to 
Mr. Pentland I still see no reason why I should change 
my opinion as already expressed. Mr. Pentland says: — "The 
F. A. and all enthusiasts desire to help and teach young 
footballers to improve their play but all such efforts will 
be in vain if Young Bird or anyone eise knocks the stuffing 
out of them by passing caustic or hurtful criticism when 
they have a day off form". That is to say, if I think 
a man is a passenger, the critic whose duty mark you is 
to criticise, not to "encourage young footballers" must not 
say so. For shame Mr. Pentland, you too have lost your 
mental perspective in Ruhleben. If Mr. Pentland plays a rotten 
game — and all things are possible in this most wonderful 




FOEGOTTEN MEMORIE 



32 







of worlds — I shall have to say so. Will Mr. Pentland's spirit 
be broken and the stuffing taken out of him for subsequent 
games? If so, it is time he gave up football and took to 
croquet. In this case Messrs. Rogans and Collinson may 
well cry preserve me from my friends for I happen to know 
both those gentlemen well enough to know that thoug'h they 
might say "I should like to push Young Bird's face in but 
all the same J did play a putrid game" they would never 
talk such twaddle as "The stuffing has been taken out of 
me and I ,am going to give up learning the game because/ 
when I try and am off form that nasty man Young Bird 
calls me a passenger". When will Mr. Pentland and others 
in the Camp who whine about criticism being out of place 
in a camp like this realise that we are in a concentration camp 
for ADULT Britishers and not in a preparatory school for young 
footb allers and other delicate plants. 

With regard to Mr. Warner's letter which I have just 
received I can only say to him what I have said to Mr. 
Pentland. Of course my idea of the game may be wrong 
and on the other hand so may Mr. Warners but if asked to 
give an account of the game and I think a man was a 
passenger there is no reason why I should not say so and 
in doing so I am certainly not hitting below the belt not 
even "in a camp like this". 



33 



NIL DESPERANDUM. 

Let's hang the lyre on a willow tree, 
Or on a wall, or on the barbed wire, 
But out of sight, as quickly, as may be, 

Let's hang the lyre. 

Let's live and LEARN, — learn what we most require 
And harp no longer in a minor key 
On smaller needs and our ONE great desire. 
We're freeto learn, thus learning to be free 
At least in mind, tili freedom be entire. 
Meanwhile, who says that we're downhearted? We?! 

LETS HANG THE LI AR! 

Sl NEWS OF WAR. 

C INEWS of War! Alas, — on evil days 

Hath Europe fallen; ever more and more 
She bleeds her hapless countries white to raise 

Sinews of war. 

We, fed and boarded free, may at the roar 
Of tax-collectors chuckle, — Some-one pays 
For us. We have no need of golden störe. 

O happy fate! And yet, as now I gaze 
Upon my Sunday slice of beef — O Lor' ! 
A new and baleful light illumes the phrase 

SINEWS of War!' 




34 




i 



Enp . Literat irre C'ircle . 



tffiursd&y ai 7 od. 

Bar. 6. Loft. 
T*aper byN.G.KAPP. 

cqnceit" 




' 



THE A. & S. IL MEETING. 

IT is worthwhile belonging to the 



A. S. U., if for no other purpose 
than that of attending their general 
meetings. They are always delight- 
ful and the last one was fully up 

%$£' didkt Lt f.7,»A to the hi S h Standard set earlier 

in the year. The proceedings start- 
ed off by the presentation of a report by the committee for 
the acceptance of the meeting and although four of the com- 
mittee themselves were not in favour of the report as it stood. 
When however, Mr. Croad, the chairman of the meeting, had 
said that it did not matter a hang whether the report was 
accepted or not, and Mr. Hatfield had added that the object- 
ionable paragraphs were only flowery prophecies, such as 
it is the custom to include in camp reports of that nature, the 
meeting decided — to reject the whole thing. 

We must confess that after that our mind became utterly 
confused. We know the A. & S. U/s committee resigned and 
that a member unsuccessfully moved that the whole Society 
be dissolved, then suddenly Mr. Pritchard was on his feet 
explaning that he had resigned from his position as chairman 
because he preferred to sit on the Education Committee as 
"Mr. Pritchard" rather than as "the embodiment of all the 
A. & S. U/s hopes and fears". Moreover, in spite of all 
his attempts to keep "it" down, "it" would come up. 
Here he was interrupted by Mr. Croad, who indignantly said 
he had never noticed anything of the kind; but it turned out, 
as we gathered from somebody eise's remarks, to be all sub- 
conscious, so it may have been there, Mr. Croad being a 
practical man. The mysterious "it" proved to be the equally 
mysterious views held on art by different members of the 
committee, mysteries which none of the Committee were pre- 
pared to elucidate. So Prof. Patchett stepped into the breach 
and gave us his ideas of art in a long and blasting diatribe 
(his own word) against certain modern art forms, which he 
hoped for the sake of the sanity of the Camp, would not 
enter into it. 



35 



In any case the committee, did not, would not, could 
not get on, and !so there was nothing- left for them to do 
but to resign. 

A new chairman was elected in the person of Mr. Hat- 
field who gracefully and modestly thanked the meeting, saying 
that though he was not much go!od, he did not think they 
would easily get anyone better and the new committee was 
chosen as follows: 

Messrs. Croad (treasurer), Pender (Secretary), Treharne, 
Higgins, Leigh-Henry, Hunt, Kapp, Cusden andjTivey. 



1F SANTA CLAUS GAME TO RUHLEBEN. 

HlS ORIGIN ßElHGr OfcSCWE 
1$ NOT HAVINQ A BRITISH 
b\RTH CERTIFICATE, HB 

ifef Nf f OFfW WOÜLB BE 3>OCK€D/ 

HiS FIVE &OB A v/eeK, 







36 



When writing home for coffee, be sure you order 

FAZENDA" 

PURE COFFEE 

Imported, roasted and packed by State 
of San Paulo <Brazil> Pure Coffee Co. Ltd. 
London. Bears Government Seal — 
Guaranteed freshly-roasted and ground. 

Specially packed in air-tight tins to preserve fresh^ 
ness and aroma of the Coffee. It is cheaper than tea. 



MISS MOLLY M'GINTY SENDS US THE 
FOLLOWINGUNSOLICITEDTESTIMONIAL: 

Frivolity Theatre, 
Ruhleben W. 

<xwd t%eMtvit leitet tu int &taüt oU<yi lait YLiAht, avid 
J Icci J niult \caVUi w^üt da ttvl 'wu nw\} 4wd J 
thil/lK it id. c/o wMUisvnt ewid "pUAC. Jt wvntvicUs 
14^C <yt 14*14 iait tou^i i/\A &iA<VC&Yid ) wU>M J aJüwaifl alt 
ipuA jMct de £a%e. jMaÜ it \ait iwttvLclid iuvi<l 
a&it t$ üct it at tAc j\a£ttStvi Jt^xti (v?al% 

UiyuAi ve/vu 4i / neeAtl<u 

rfhMy tft'JUtty. 
English Toffee: 2 packets 15 Pfg. at Ruhleben Stores. 



37 



Jt is with deep gratification that we publish the 
f ollowing letter, which has been handed to us by Mr. Dix. 



Buckingham Palace. 

To 

Arthur Dix Esq. , 

Lord Stamf ordham has received 
from the Honble., Sir Sidney Gre- 
ville a complete set of the Maga- 
zines published by those who are 
interned in the English Camp at 
Ruhleben. 

These have been laid before the 
King, who has received them with 
deep interest, but with increased 
feelings of sympathy for those of 
his subjects who, during their in 
ternment, are displaying such 
pluck and cheerf ulness . 

18th December 1915. 



38 

1 THE RUHLEBEN DAILY NEWS I 






Published 
at Printing Office Daily at 10 a. m. Priee one halfpenny. 

EDITED BY L. SPICER. 

Gontains translations of the official reports published, and 
other items interesting to us, appearing in the German 
papers; buf no eomments are permitted on our pari. 






This little paper is prouided espeeially for the benefit of 
those who are unable to read German and will proue a 
oaluable medium for disseminating war news and it is 
♦:♦ hoped that many will avail themseloes of the opportunity 
♦:♦ of purchasing a eopy daily. The paper does not pretend 
♦:♦ to be one of literary merit, but it is our aim to qet the news 
♦:♦ to the Camp as eoneisely and as quickly as possible. 
% 



EXCHANGE AND MART 

Barrack 5B 
originated and conducted by 

MORTIMORE HOWARD. 

:-: Recognised as a public Institution. :-: 
Patronised by the Captains of the Camp. 

New and second hand clothing, 
Musical Instruments, Watches, 
Jewellery, Woollen Goods, Caps, 
Electric Lamps, Boots and Shoes. 

Foodstuffs, soaps, toilet requisites, tobacco, ciga- 
rettes, in fact anything from a tin-tack to a battleship. 

♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



39 



RUGBY. 

THE First Round of the Rugby Leagfue is over, and the 
* Camp may congratulate itself upon the Standard of play at- 
tained. , Much keenness has been shown, and a general all 
round improvement is apparent. 

Our prop'hecies with respect to the teams have only been 
partly fullfilled. We predicted that the Barbarians would render 
good account of themselves, and our prediction has held 
good in so far as they have tied for the first place with 1 
Blackheath, who have shown unexpected form. We cannot 
help thinking however that the Barbarians are capable of 
even better things and shall expect to see them ^go up one" 
at the close of the next round. Wasps too are a much im- 
proved side and, with more of the ball, should give any side 
a hard fight. Nomads are frankly disappointing; with such 
a fast three-quarter line and heavy "scrum" one would have 
expected fetter results. We expect them to do a lo't better 
in the "second half". Harlequins have made big strides since the 
beginning of the sea- 
son. Although low on ; ^T] 
the list, they have 
succeeded in giving 
every team a hard 
fight. Blackheath has 
been a surprise packet, 
and owes its success 
to the keenness of its 
scrum, and, probably 
still more to the fact 
that it invariably 
tackles low.High tackl- 
ing has proved the 
downfall of most of 
the teams at one time 
or another. 

United Services 
had bad luck in losing 
Harris, their captain, 
and Ritchie, the leader 
of their forwards. We 
are sorry to hear that 
the^lformer will be 
unable to take further 




OUR ARTIST'S XMAS CARD. 



40 



The Ruhleben Literary and 
Debating Society. 

After a period of unavoidable inactivity this Society has 
resumed its labours. 

This Society has been dubbed "The Parliament of Ruhleben" 
and again "The Talking Club". Be that as it may, the Society 
is fully awake to the fact that the inmates of the Camp, in 
every branch of life and in every department of£activity, at 
present enjoy facilities which were undreamt of at the time of 
its formation; and, in the consciousness of this fact, is deter- 
mined to rise to its opportunities and to avail itself to the füll 
of these facilities. 

With this aim inview, the Society has resolved to redouble 
its efforts during the new year which is, unfortunately, opening 
upon us here. It has a year of experience behind it; it will 
benefit from passed mistakes and failures; it will avoid pitfalls; 
and, with the hearty and loyal support of the Citiziens of Ruh- 
leben, which it will do its best to retain, the Society will not 
confine its efforts to the promotion and holding of Debates, 
but will strive to develope the literary side (which offers a wide 
field in itself) and also to introduce new features. In all these 
endeavours the Society, working on broad populär lines, will 
have as its ideal Amüsement, Instruction and the Stimulation 
of Ideas. 

As examples of the widened scope of the activities of the 
Society may be mentioned the following events which took 
place recently: — 

Tues., Nov. 30 th. An Address on "The Poet" by Mr. 
W. H. Butterworth. 

Tues., Dec. 7 the. A Dramatic Recital by the West Indian 
Actor Mr. P. Sylvester Leon, to which Explanatory Remarks 
were contributed by Mr. Israel Cohen. 

Owing to changes which have taken place in the various 
Barracks since the foundation of the Society, it has been found 
necessary to re-constitute its Committee, the principle followed 
being that the Committee should be formed by the represen- 
tatives of the Barracks. This is now being done the Officers 
elected for the Session 1915 — 1916: — 

Mr. W. H. BUTTERWORTH, President 

Mr. C. J. PEARKE, Chairman 

Mr. R. SIMMS, Treasurer 

Mr. P. SYLVESTER LEON (9), Secretary. 



liü 



41 

part in games this season, but we welcome the return of 
the latter to his old place. 

Tihe games up to the present have been fought out among 
the forwards. This is probably due to the affection of the 
halves for the ball, clinging to it as they d,o : un|fcil brought 
down, and never giving' their 3/ 4 üne a fair chance. The re- 
fereeing has not always been quite "up to the mark"; but 
few or any complaints have been made as to the ruling in 
first league matches. Criticising the referee is always an easy 
tas'k; the obvious retort for the victim is "Try and do it 
better yourself". We have no intention of making any such 
attempt, but are always willing to abide by the referee's de- 
cision. . 

No remarks can be made about Second Team matches, 
owing to the great difficulty some barracks had in raising 
teams, but we congratulate Wasps and Barbarians on their 
good record. 

A Cup-Tie Round is commencing on Thursday Nov. 25th; 
the Second Rounds of the league will be played after Christ- 
mas. The International Matches will wind up the season. 



SCORES, 



Barbarians 

Blackheath 

Nomads 

Wasps 

Harlequins 



Matches 
played 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 



W. 

3 
4 
3 
2 
1 



United Services 



L. 



1 
1 

2 
4 
5 



D. Pts. for Pts. v. 



23 
41 
16 
30 
25 
3 



17 
10 
5 
29 
29 
48 




42 



Ruh leben Camp Stores 



books 



NEW AND 



SECOND HAND 



IN ALL LANOUAGES 



MUSIC 



AND 



STATION ERY 



AT LOWEST PRICES 



LARGE STOCK IN HAND 



APPLY BETWEEN 2 p. m. AND 4 p. m. 
(WEEKDAYS ONLY) TO:— 



F. L MUSSETT 



THE OFFICIALCAMP'S BOOK-SHOP 
BOND STREET 



llllllllllllllillll 



IIP 



43 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. 

Dear Sir: '- ► > 

In connection with the Red Cross Bed collection, which 
admirable Institution we are sure every true Britisher in this 
Camp will do his utmost to support, might I take the liberty 
of announcing through your Journal a means by which every 
prisoner might materially help. At the engraving kiosk a 
beautifully carved egg-shell is on view, which was specially 
done for this worthy object, i. e. assisting in the collection 
of funds for the Bed: AND WILL BE RAFFLED AND THE, 
ENTIRE PROCEEDS WILL QO TO THE RUHLEBEN BED. 
There are only about 8 of these carved egg-shells in existence, 
and they are in the possession of the British and other Royal 
Families, so one with the Ruhleben Coat of Arms and the 
Royal Crown will be an article of curiosity and great value. 
The shell, in a finely hand-carved and padded casket, is to 
be handed to the winner of the raffle, which will take place 
about the middle (of January. Tickets are on sale at the en- 
graving kiosk, price 30 Pf. each, and the barracks will shortly 
be canvassed, so that no one may have an excuse for inpt 
participating in this most worthy of all undertakings : the 
assisting of our brave soldiers who have the enviable task of 
doing something for their country. 

A PRISONER. 




BAR. 12 ON PARADE. 



44 



THE "JELLOGRAPH" 

Music, Colour and Manuscript Printing Works 

BARRACK5B 

(originated by Mortimore Howard) 

Managing Direktor: Mr." SAMUEL PEARSON. Music department 

conducted by Mr. JOHN S. FORSTER, of Messrs. SCHOTT & CO. 

Music publishers, Regent St., London. 



Printers to Football Committee, Golf Club, Church Choir, Empire, 
Germ. Dramatic Society, French Dramatic Society, Camp School, 
Brit. Ruhleben Assn., London & Home Counties Assn., Supplies 
Delivery, 25 Club, School of Languages, Exchange & Mart, Populär 
Concert Committee, Cricket Club, British, Sussex, Practical. 
Central American, Forgetme-not, and Japanese Laundries, Arts 
& Science Union, &c. 



THE 

R. X, D, 

POST- OFFICE 

5, KING EDWARD ST. W. C. 



does all postal-service cheaply and quickly. 



45 



'T'HE Entertainments Committee have handed us 
the following provisional programme for the Com- 
ing three months. All are plays with which many 
of us are already familiär with the exception of the 
three u one-acters" on Feb. lOth, all of which have 
been written in Camp, the first by Mr. Tivey and 
the last by Mr. H. Miller: 
Jan. 13, 1916. Playboy of the Western World. 

Erbförster. 

Great Adventure. 

Othello. 

Right Age to Marry; Geordie; 
Breakers Ahead. 

Variety Show. 

Passing of the Third Floor Back. 

Alias Jimmy Valentine. 

Passers By. 



» 


20 


M 


27 


Feb. 


3 


i) 


10 


)) 


17 


■» 


24 


Mar 


. 2 


55 


9 



THE PANTOMIME. 

YVTE are debarred from commenting at length on 
the Christmas Pantomime in this nurnber and 
must reserve our sketches and criticisms for our next 
issue. We would, however, like to congratulate all 
concerned in the undertaking. The show may well 
have surprised Ambassador Gerard and his party 
who visited the gala Performance for as a production 
of a prisoner's camp it was nothing short of mar- 
vellous. Mr. John Roker, the producer, Mr. Brooks 
the author, Mr. Well and who designed the dresses 
and the charming girls and boys of the chorous, the 
dainty Cinderella, the scene-shifters who manage the 
quite incredible transformation scene and the rest of 
them have all earned our heartiest thanks and we 
will give them more of it in our next. 



46 



THANKS 



In view of the permission kindly accorded us 
by the Censor to send our Xmas Number to Eng- 
land, we should like to take this opportunity of 
thanking the folks at home in the name of the 
whole Camp for the generosity and kindly thought 
which has filled our parcels-office. 

Those who did not receive any parcels from 
Home were looked öfter by a small committee 
here in the Camp and such was the generosity of 
those who had been more fortunate that we can 
safely say that there was no man in the Camp 
whose Christmasbreakfast table was not graced 
by a handsome parcel. We may perhaps venture 
to offer a word of ad vice to those at Home with 
regard to catering for the needs of their Ruh- 
lebenites. Thefirst essential is butter, or, failing 
that, margarine or dripping. Though most of us 
have been on the Continent for nearly two years, 
our stomach still yearns for its morning bacon 
and, we may remark in passing, it is stränge how 
well bacon Stands the journey! For the rest, we 
can only congratulate the old folks at Home on 
the wonderful pertinacity they have shown in 
anticipating our wants. 



47 

THE DAY-DREAM. 

A train of thought! — How sweet, when in disgust 
With life and all the trouble life has brought, 
To follow, as we wander through the dust, 

A train of thought. 

To think you're FREE, — to fance you have caught 

The Night-Express and momently are thrust 

Yards nearer Home, — O word with comfort fraught! 

And then— CRASH ! BANG!! What? Has the boiler bust? 
No, — you've encountered, wand'ring all destraught, 
The flag-staff! — It was no Express, — 't was just. 

A train of thought. 



music v. r. d. s. 

The Pros and Cons of subjects they uncoil 
As many-coloured as chameleons, 
When into Speech and speechlet down they boil 
The Pros and Cons. 

A Court of Savants rules them, and of Dons, 
Crammed füll of wisdom, reared on midnight-oil, 
August, sublime, — like demigods in bronze. 

Yet greater still, a gracious counterfoil, 
The Artists and their baton-waving bonze, 
Since Concord, not Contention, crowns their toil. — 
The Pros and Cons. 



"IN RCJHLEBEN CAMP" 

The official organ of the Engländerlager, Ruhleben. 
Pubiishers: The Camp Education Committee. 
Editor and Publicity Manager: T. R. Barton. 
All inquiries to be made at the office: 
No. 2, Fleet Street, Ruhleben. 



48 

♦:♦ * 

♦:♦ * 

! "IN RUHLEBEN CAMP" ! 



* 

* 
* 
♦:♦ 






is a better advertising medium here 
than any other English paper. 

♦ 
* 

% Ask for rates: % 

! ATTHE OFFICE 1 

* ♦ 

£ No. 2, Fleet Street. $ 

♦:♦ ♦:♦ 

♦ ♦:♦ 

* * 

♦♦♦♦<*♦♦♦♦>♦♦ ^♦♦♦♦^^ 



PRACTIGAL SHOEMAKER 

Hand-sewn or wooden-pegged. 

Don't rely on amateurs ! 
Good work guaranteed! 

THEBESTOFLEATHERUSED 

The Shoemaker's Shop, 

DAVID ORRELL 

Bond Street. W. 



Printed by the BERLINER BUCH- UND KUNSTDRUCKEREI, BERLIN W 35— ZOSSEN. 



Have you contributed 
to 
The Ruhleben Bed? 

IF THERE IS NO BOX IN YOUR 
BARRACK YOU WILL FIND 
ONE AT OUR OFFICE. 



NOTE! 

CHEQUES ON YOUR ENGLISH BANK ARE 
VERY ACCEPTABLE. 




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